Democrats, Elections, politics, Republicans, Uncategorized

Why Does It Matter?

I read an article today that said that the Secretary of the State of Georgia, Brian Kemp (R), wants to keep newly-registered voters from exercising their Constitutional right to vote in the June 20th run-off election in District 6.

He has declared that these voters are only eligible if they registered by March 20, which is 92 days before the 6/20 election. His justification is that the run-off is simply a continuation of special election to replace Tom Price, who was appointed to the President’s cabinet

However, the National Voter Registration Act of 1993 says clearly that the deadline for voter registration for a Federal election is 60 days, whether it be general, special, primary or run-off.

Why does this matter?

I believe this matters because most of us were raised to believe in fairness — that the process by which a result is produced is as important as the result itself. More and more I’m seeing that our Republican leaders are willing to manipulate the processes to produce the desired result.

Why does this matter?

I believe this matters because each of us has been Constitutionally guaranteed the right to vote our conscience to choose the best candidate for an elected position. By manipulating the system so blatantly, those in powerful offices are negating our ability to choose and stifling our voices. They’re saying they know better, and we don’t know what we’re doing.

Why does this matter?

I believe this matters because even though most of us don’t want a lot of government interference in our lives, by voiding our rights to vote, government is interfering and controlling our lives. We as citizens will lose our right to dissent. Already, there are attempts to curtail our rights to assemble (and protest), speak freely, and have a free press.

Why does this matter?

I believe this matters because there is a systematic eroding of our Constitutional rights, with the end result being that our liberties to gather together, to criticize our government, our freedom to determine our own paths, will be taken away from us by an elitist few who think they are better than us. If Republicans continue to change the rules arbitrarily to manipulate the outcome to suit themselves, I can see them trying to avoid free and open elections completely.

Why does this matter?

This matters because this is not strictly a Democrat issue. Just because you’re a registered Republican doesn’t mean that your freedoms won’t be curtailed too.

We all need to step up and say no.

You need to step up and say no.

We all need to step up and say stop this.

You need to step up and say stop this.

 

 

 

Democrats, Elections, politics, Uncategorized

The Enemy is Us

Today, I read a Facebook post by a Missouri State Representative, Randy D. Dunn, in which he said that “The House was preparing to pass a bill honoring a man who’s [sic] wife, upon his encouragement wrote a book with the language below in dedication to him. Following my reading of the excerpt from the book on the House floor the bill was laid over.”

The man was Henry Rowe Schoolcraft, whom I had not heard of, so, of course, when I got home from work I consulted the oracle, Google, to gain more knowledge.

Schoolcraft was born in New York state, lived from 1793 to 1864, and did a few things, like publish a six-volume commissioned study called Indian Tribes of the United States. He was a geographer, a geologist, and an ethnologist. His first wife was of mixed-race — Scots-Irish and Ojibwe. She died in 1842.

Schoolcraft remarried in 1847 – this time to a slave-owning woman from South Carolina. Apparently, she spoke a lot about her life on the plantation, and he suggested she write about it. She did, publishing the novel, The Black Gauntlet: A Tale of Plantation Life in South Carolina in 1860. The linked excerpt above is from her dedication to her husband for encouraging her to write her memories, and in this whole dedication, while she thanks him the encouragement, she’s really talking about herself.

Are her words ugly? To my ears, to my eyes, to my mind, yes. But I cannot condemn a man’s life of achievement for the prejudice and bigotry of his second wife.

I’m not defending the words of an antebellum slave-owner; this happened to be a good example of a legislator taking something out of context to illustrate guilt by association: Schoolcraft the explorer must have harbored the same pro-slavery sentiment since he married a slave-owning woman.

Her words, her book’s dedication to him, surely proves it, because we instinctively understand the power of words.

We use words to build people up, we use them to tear people down. Once spoken, they cannot be unspoken. Once written, once printed, once published, they cannot be brought back to the barn — they belong to the universe.

Words taken out of context have been used over and over to smear, ridicule, and destroy. Few of us take the time to find the original quote or interview. Many of us simply accept what’s told to us, possibly because we trust the person providing the quote.

We are now living in a culture of “fake news” and “alternate facts,” and it’s become vitally important that we look beneath the shimmer and gloss to what lies beneath.

“We have met the enemy and he is us.” — Pogo